With more than 10,000 bones lining its walls, Hueso sounds like a fairly nightmarish place to have dinner. There is no sign outside this Guadalajara restaurant; just a single bone hanging ominously from the white tiled exterior. But once you step inside and see the animal bones artfully fixed to its whitewashed walls, any thoughts of macabre catacombs are quickly forgotten. With chunky whale bones, a whole snake skeleton, and even a tiger skull on display, it feels more like a mash-up of a natural history museum and a modern art exhibition. “For a chef, a bone represents flavor,” 45-year-old chef Alfonso Cadena tells me. “Besides, at the end of the day this is the truth behind cooking: a lot[…]

Edward Lee really doesn’t have any time to be taking on extra work. The chef, restaurateur, cookbook author, and television star is opening two new spots in the coming months—a restaurant in Washington, DC, and a bar in Louisville, Kentucky—not to mention turning in another cookbook. But he’s somehow finding time for community development, and it could help solve the nation’s line cook shortage. At his flagship restaurant 610 Magnolia, Lee spoke to MUNCHIES about the Chef LEE (Let’s Empower Employment) Initiative. It’s not a charity, and it’s not a stage situation. Young people who get admitted to the LEE Initiative go through a paid 40-week program designed to teach vocational skills by working every single job in his restaurants.[…]

It’s been almost a year since my boyfriend and I set off from under the shadow of Croagh Patrick in rain coats and padded shorts, laden down with homemade soda bread and a tent, to cycle the width of Ireland all the way back to Dublin, just days after both the centenary of the Easter Rising and St. Patrick’s Day. My boyfriend is pretty Irish. Both sides of his family are from the same county in the West of Ireland, his hair turns to copper in the sun, and his mother drinks Guinness when she’s ill instead of taking tablets. But it was my idea to cycle the width of the country, with nothing but a variety of rubber and[…]

When I was 18-years-old, my mother found out she had cancer. It was such a shock and the worst time. I spent the next two years looking after her and was her primary carer because my dad had to work and my sisters were at university or working. I had first-hand experience of all the problems she faced—like her losing her hair and the depression that comes with getting a terminal illness. Even though the chemotherapy and the radiotherapy were going to prolong her life, they weren’t ever going to cure her. My mum also lost her sense of taste. You eat so many times a day and knowing that flavours would be dulled for the remainder of her life[…]

Every Friday, Liz Nguyen and Joseph Tam bring bags of fresh vegetables, nuts, beans, spices, and herbs to a spacious, white-tiled kitchen behind Broadway Market in East London. Over the course of the evening, they prepare two days’ worth of vegan Vietnamese food to sell at their new food stall, Eat Chay. Using the Vietnamese word for “vegetarian” or “vegan,” Eat Chay showcases Nguyen and Tam’s take on both vegan and Asian food, combining the two in a way that actually harkens back to Vietnam’s pre-Colonial cuisine. “A lot of the ‘authentic’ Vietnamese dishes that Westerners know about—usually the French had a lot of influence over that,” says Nguyen. Originally hailing from Hanoi (Nguyen) and Hong Kong (Tam), the pair[…]

Every Friday, Liz Nguyen and Joseph Tam bring bags of fresh vegetables, nuts, beans, spices, and herbs to a spacious, white-tiled kitchen behind Broadway Market in East London. Over the course of the evening, they prepare two days’ worth of vegan Vietnamese food to sell at their new food stall, Eat Chay. Using the Vietnamese word for “vegetarian” or “vegan,” Eat Chay showcases Nguyen and Tam’s take on both vegan and Asian food, combining the two in a way that actually harkens back to Vietnam’s pre-Colonial cuisine. “A lot of the ‘authentic’ Vietnamese dishes that Westerners know about—usually the French had a lot of influence over that,” says Nguyen. Originally hailing from Hanoi (Nguyen) and Hong Kong (Tam), the pair[…]

“This dish is gonna be like POP POP—it’s a little bit spicy from the Thai chilies, sour from the fresh yuzu, and umami from the mushrooms and truffle,” says Pichaya “Pam” Utharntharm as she arranges creamy, translucent slices of Hokkaido scallops on seashells. “I love appetizers, because you get to play around. There aren’t as many rules as with a main course.” For the final flourish, she hoists a canister of liquid nitrogen up and pours a steady stream of freezing vapors over the plates. Somewhat intimidated by how casually she wields something the size of a toddler that could easily take one’s hand off, I ask if she’s ever been burned. “Oh, from this?” she asks. “I’ve done this[…]

In almost every corner of Los Amantes mezcalería in Oaxaca, there seems to be someone or something watching over you. On one wall, it’s a taxidermied goat’s head. On another, it’s a painting of a young, fully nude woman. Behind the bar, there’s a papier-mâché person crashing through a glass cabinet. Los Amantes opened in 2006, before mezcal’s exponential rise in popularity. The owners—artist Guillermo Olguin, master distiller Eric Hernández, as well as Ignacio Carballido and Gerardo Rejón—wanted to create a place to showcase their mezcal and educate tourists, both Mexican and international, about the spirit in general. The bar is minuscule; it doesn’t even have a bathroom. Los Amantes: come for the decor stay for the wild agave mezcal.[…]

Bartender Sebastián Fernández had to fly about eight hours from his home in Mexico City to San Juan, Puerto Rico on February 17, 2017. He was scheduled for a guest spot at Old San Juan bar La Factoría, where he’d make and film his entry to the Bacardí Legacy Cocktail Competition, part of his promotional package for the nine-year-old contest. His entry, the Micaela, is named for the Puerto Rican boogaloo song—one that reflects tropical joy, “that happy and fun part that characterizes us and identifies us as Latinos and Caribbean,” he tells me. Fernández was sent home, though—barred from entering the US territory where, despite being citizens, the residents of the island don’t have any say in who becomes[…]

I arrive at The Snapery—a bakery in Bermondsey, South London—first thing in the morning, but I’m worried that I’ve already missed the action. Walking towards the door, I pass a delivery bike on its way out and when I enter, just a few loaves of bread are left on the racks. “I would shake your hand but I’m covered in flour,” says Richard Snapes, The Snapery’s eponymous founder. “We’ve been here since 2 AM so there aren’t many baked loaves left, but come on in. We’re still shaping some bread that’s about to go into the fridge.” The remaining loaves after a morning’s work at The Snapery bakery in Bermondsey, South London. All photos by the author. Already seven hours[…]